Home » Czech Republic » Why Czech Republic?

The Czech Republic is located in central Europe and is easily accessible by rail, road and air. Currently over 58 airlines fly to Prague from over 100 destinations around the globe.

Part of what was formerly Czechoslovakia and historically of the regions of Bohemia, Moravia and Silesia, the Czech Republic is a culturally rich multi faceted destination which attracts visitors from throughout the world.

The Czech Republic boasts 12 UNESCO World Heritage Sites including the historic centres of Prague and Cesky Krumlov. Given its size and population it is the world's leading country in the UNESCO stakes!

The country is a natural choice for many reasons:

  • Easy access

  • Safety

  • Superb range of hotels from boutique to large conference properties. Most of the major international hotel chains have a presence in the Czech Republic

  • Custom built convention centres

  • Good value for money

  • Great destination for all types of MICE events including incentives, conferences and exhibitions

  • A bewildering choice of restaurants and outside venues for unique functions. These include breweries, palaces, castles and monasteries

  • Transfers can be made very special by using unusual forms of transport including historic trams and vintage Czech cars such as Skodas and Tatras. The tram experience can be enhanced by musicians on board and the serving of drinks.

  • Opportunities for team building are numerous and can include vehicles (and indeed weapons!) from the Soviet era.

  • Wide range of entertainment available including local favourites such as puppet shows. The normally cost much less than in the rest of Europe!

  • Excellent food and drink. Czech beer is considered the best in the world!
  • The Czech Republic is more than Prague! The medieval town of Cesky Krumlov and Karlovy Vary (home of a world famous film festival) and many other places are well worth visiting.

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Thirteen things you may or may not know about the Czech Republic and famous Czechs

  • The largest stadium in the world is the Strahov Stadium in Prague. In communist times it was the venue for the great gymnastics spectacular Spartakiad and is also a famous concert venue. The Rolling Stones played there in front of 250,000 people. Many think of the Maracana in Rio as the largest but that is a soccer stadium where an attendance of 200,000 is still the record crowd for a football match.
  • Prague Castle is the largest castle complex in the world and the Spanish Hall is stunning venue for a prestigious meeting or gala dinner.

  • Czechs currently hold two athletics world records. Jarmila Kratochvílová in the woman's 800 metres and Jan Železný in the men's javelin. Both records where set over 20 years ago with Jan Železný setting a mark of over 98 metres. He has the five longest throws in history to his name.

  • The great Emil Zátopek is the only man in history to have won gold medals at the Olympic Games at distances of 5,000 metres, 10,000 metres and the marathon which he achieved in Helsinki in 1952. This was the first time that he ran the marathon! Emil Zátopek was an exceptional man and role model. He actually gave one of his gold medals to his friend, the Australian runner Ron Clarke. Clarke was a prolific setter of words records (17 in total) but never won an Olympic gold medal. Zatopek thought he deserved one hence this magnanimous gesture!

  • The Czech Republic (or Czechoslovakia as it was previously known) have never won the World Cup in soccer though they reached the final in Chile in 1962. They were beaten 3 - 1 by Brasil and did score first!

  • Great Czech tennis players include Martina Navratilova and Ivan Lendl.

  • Prague is a wonderful city to see Art Deco and Art Nouveau. World renowned Czech artists include Egon Schiele and Alphonse Mucha.

  • In the literary world Franz Kafka and Milan Kundera are considered giants.

  • Famous Czech music composers include Leoš Janáček, Antonín Dvořák, Bedřich Smetana and Bohuslav Martinů. Also Gustav Mahler was born in Bohemia. Pieces such as Má Vlast, The Slavonic Dances and slow movement of Mahler's 5th Symphony (often referred to as Death in Venice) are amongst the most renowned in classical music.

  • Prague boasts some superb hotels across the whole range of properties. In the boutique area there is an unique hotel called The Aria which is themed on music. The hotel and its facilities pay homage to great composers, conductors and musicians in several genres including classical, jazz and popular music.

  • In the past the Czech Republic or Czechoslovakia was known as Bohemia. The word is used in the English language to signify a life style which is relaxed, informal and avant-garde. Also this name was part of the title of one of the famous popular songs ever recorded - Bohemian Rhapsody by Freddie Mercury and Queen.

  • Bohemian crystal is prized throughout the world and items and chandeliers crafted from this crystal adorn palaces, museums of home of the rich, famous and wealthy.

  • Lastly and by no means least there is Czech beer which is considered by independent experts to be the finest in the world. Iconic brands such as Pilsner Urquell, Budweiser and Staropramen enjoy a stellar international reputation.